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Practice Name

Winslow Animal Clinic

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Primary Location
800 Ericksen Ave. N.E.
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
Phone: 206-842-6621
Fax: 206-842-6387

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday7:30am6:00pm
Tuesday7:30am6:00pm
Wednesday7:30am6:00pm
Thursday7:30am6:00pm
Friday7:30am6:00pm
Saturday8:00am12:00pm
SundayClosedClosed
Main Content

Winter Holiday Hazards - 2017

Winter Holiday Hazards For Pets

Here are some tips for keeping your pets out of danger during the holiday season.

AVOID Holiday Food Items That Could Cause Problems For Your Pet

  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Chocolate (baker's, semi-sweet, milk chocolate)
  • Coffee (grounds, beans, chocolate covered espresso beans)
  • Moldy or spoiled foods
  • Onions, onion powder
  • Fatty foods
  • Salt
  • Yeast dough

PLANTS

  • Lilies that may be found in holiday flower arrangements could be deadly to your cat. Many types of lily, such as Tiger, Asian, Japanese Show, Easter, Stargazer, and the Casa Blanca, can cause kidney failure in cats.
  • Poinsettias are generally over-rated in toxicity. If ingested, poinsettias can be irritating to the mouth and stomach, and may cause mild vomiting or nausea.
  • Mistletoe has the potential to cause cardiovascular problems. However, mistletoe ingestion usually only causes gastrointestinal upset.
  • Holly ingestion could cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and lethargy.

HAZARDS AROUND THE CHRISTMAS TREE

  • Christmas tree water may contain fertilizers, which, if ingested, can cause stomach upset. Stagnant tree water can be breeding grounds for bacteria, which can also lead to vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea, if ingested.
  • Electric cords- Avoid animal exposure to electric cords. If they were chewed, they could electrocute your pet. Cover up or hide electric cords, never let your pet chew on them.
  • Ribbons or tinsel can get caught up in the intestines and cause intestinal obstruction.
  • Batteries contain corrosives. If ingested they can cause ulceration to the mouth, tongue, and the rest of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Glass ornaments can cut the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract if ingested.
  • Potpourris are popular household fragrances commonly used during the holiday season. Pets are often exposed to liquid potpourri by direct ingestion from simmer pots or spills, or by rubbing against leaky bottles or simmer pots containing the potpourri, or from spilling the containers upon themselves. Oral exposures result following grooming. Exposure of pets to some types of liquid potpourris can result in severe oral, dermal, and ocular damage. Dry potpourri generally doesn't cause those issues, but there may be problems due to foreign body and (possibly) toxic plant ingestion.

MEDICATIONS

Keep all prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs out of the reach of your pets, preferably in closed cabinets. Pain killers, cold medicines, anti-cancer, drugs, antidepressants, vitamins, and diet pills are common examples of human medication that could be potentially lethal even in small dosages. One

regular-strength ibuprofen tablet (200mg) can cause stomach ulcers in a 10-pound dog. Remind holiday guests to store their medications safely as well.

During the holidays, many veterinary clinics have limited office hours. In some cases, pet owners try to medicate their animals without their veterinarian's advice. Never give your animal any medications unless under the directions of veterinarian. Many medications that are used safely in humans can be deadly when used inappropriately. Less than one regular strength acetaminophen tablet (325mg) can be dangerous to a cat weighing 7lbs.

OTHER WINTER HAZARDS

  • Antifreeze has a pleasant taste. Unfortunately, very small amounts can be lethal. As little as one teaspoon of antifreeze can be deadly to a cat; less than four teaspoons can be dangerous to a 10-pound dog. Thoroughly clean up any spills, store antifreeze in tightly closed containers and store in secured cabinets. Automotive products such as gasoline, oil and antifreeze should be stored in areas that are inaccessible to your pets. Propylene glycol is a safer form of antifreeze. Low Tox™ brand antifreeze contains propylene glycol and is recommended to use in pet households.
  • If you think your pet has consumed antifreeze, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-4-ANI-HELP) right away!
  • Liquid potpourris are popular household fragrances commonly used during the holiday season. Pets are often exposed to liquid potpourri by direct ingestion from simmer pots or spills, or by rubbing against leaky bottles or simmer pots containing the potpourri, or from spilling the containers upon themselves. Oral exposures result following grooming. Exposure of pets to some types of liquid potpourris can result in severe oral, dermal and ocular damage.
  • Ice melting products can be irritating to skin and mouth. Depending on the actual ingredient of the ice melt and the quantity, signs of ingestion would include excessive drooling, depression, vomiting or even electrolyte imbalances.
  • Rat and mouse killers are used more commonly during colder weather. When using rat and mouse bait, place the products in areas that are inaccessible to your companion animals.

ALWAYS Be Prepared !!!!

Your animal may become poisoned in spite of your best efforts to prevent it. You should keep telephone numbers for your veterinarian, a local emergency veterinary service, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-4 ANI-HELP) in a convenient location. If you suspect that your pet has ingested something poisonous, seek medical attention immediately.

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center
1-888-4ANI-HELP

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, an operating division of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) is a unique, emergency hotline providing 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week telephone assistance to veterinarians and pet owners. The Center's hotline veterinarians can quickly answer questions about toxic substances found in our everyday surroundings that can be dangerous to animals. The Center maintains a wide collection of reference materials and computer databases that help provide toxicological information for various species. Veterinary professionals provide around-the-clock, on-site coverage of the Center. The licensed staff members share over one hundred and ten years of combined call center experience and over seventy-five years of combined toxicology, clinical, and diagnostic experience. The phone number of the Center is 1-888-4-ANI-HELP (1-888-426-4435) and the website is https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control.


Date Published: 12/11/2001
Date Reviewed/Revised: 06/07/2010

September 2017

We are busting at the seams!!!

We are asking for your patience while we explore the possibility of expanding our current building or finding a new place to move to.  Things are in the works, but some things take time.  We hope to have this sorted out in the near future.

Thank you,

Winslow Animal Clinic

Dr. Thomas B. Penn, DVM

Spring/Summer 2017

Fleas are here - make sure your pet/s are protected.

Image result for flea

IMPORTANT NEWS! -

Snail, Slug Bait Poisoning in Dogs

As of 5/15/17 we have already seen 2 cases of slug bait ingestion by dogs.  Please keep your pets safe by not using this product in/near your yard.  Don't forget that your neighbors may be using this product, unaware of the harmful nature of it.

*****Plant Toxicity for Pets*****

The warmer weather brings more exposure to bats that may/may not have rabies.  Please check out the information at the link below to find out more about what to do to protect your pets and yourselves and what to do if there is a possible exposure/bite/scratch from a bat.

INFORMATION ABOUT BATS AND RABIES

Hours of Operation
Day Morning Afternoon
Monday 7:30am 6:00pm
Tuesday 7:30am 6:00pm
Wednesday 7:30am 6:00pm
Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm
Friday 7:30am 6:00pm
Saturday 8:00am 12:00pm
Sunday Closed Closed
New Year's Day Closed Closed
Memorial Day Closed Closed
Independence Day Closed Closed
Labor Day Closed Closed
Thanksgiving Day Closed Closed
Christmas Eve (12/24) 8:00am 12:00pm
Christmas Day (12/25) Closed Closed

Our Services

We strive to provide complete care for our patients. Learn more about our services here:

Read More

Make an appointment

If you would like to schedule an appointment, please follow the link below:

Schedule Now

NOTICE: PLEASE HAVE YOUR PET SECURED ON A LEASH OR IN A CARRIER PRIOR TO ENTERING THE LOBBY TO HELP ENSURE THE SAFETY OF YOU AND YOUR PET. THANK YOU!

Testimonial

“Apart from the fact that everybody is knowledgeable, they also are very friendly and loving towards the animals and have never made me feel rushed.”  Rosemary K. 2017


“Dr. Barfield is wonderful & so supportive, she helps us be the best dog mom & dad we can be!”. Gaynol F. 2017


“I have brought my dogs to Winslow Animal Clinic since I moved to the Island in 2005. The care they receive is wonderful, the staff is experienced and kind and the doctors are great - we love them all. Thank you”. Vicki R. & Bobbie the pug, 2017

Contact

Winslow Animal Clinic
800 Ericksen Ave. N.E.
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
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Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday7:30am6:00pm
Tuesday7:30am6:00pm
Wednesday7:30am6:00pm
Thursday7:30am6:00pm
Friday7:30am6:00pm
Saturday8:00am12:00pm
SundayClosedClosed
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